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Broccolini

Background

This unique vegetable is a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale. The Sakata Seed Company in Japan developed the vegetable in 1993 and it was originally named “aspabroc”. Its appearance resembles that of a broccoli and asparagus as it has a long stem and buds at the top. It has an asparagus-like flavor, sweeter than regular broccoli. Broccolini stems are also more tender when cooked. Popular methods of preparation include steaming, sautéing, roasting and stir-frying.

 

Benefits

  • High in vitamin A, which is important for immune function, cancer prevention and maintaining healthy arteries!
  • An excellent source of vitamin C. This water-soluble vitamin is important for maintaining and repairing tissues in the body. It also helps your body absorb more iron.
  • A great source of calcium! This mineral has many functions, including building bones, helping with muscle contraction and preventing blood clotting.
  • Provides iron, which is essential in the formation of red blood cells.

 

Nutritional Value of ½ cup (45g) of Cooked Broccolini

  • 10 calories
  • 8 g carbohydrate
  • 2 g fibre
  • 5 g protein
  • 3 g fat
  • About 15% daily vitamin A requirements
  • 22% of daily vitamin C needs

 

Did You Know

The name “broccolini” was trademarked by Mann’s in 1998. Broccolini is now grown in California and Arizona and is sold in the US, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom.

 

Recipes

Lemon Garlic Broccolini